Home Sport Selbst nach der Verletzung von Kyle Filipowski ist das Stürmen auf dem Court eine Sucht, mit der College-Basketball-Fans nicht aufhören wollen

Selbst nach der Verletzung von Kyle Filipowski ist das Stürmen auf dem Court eine Sucht, mit der College-Basketball-Fans nicht aufhören wollen

von NFI Redaktion

Court-storming has been the most controversial tradition in college basketball for decades. On one hand, it is a symbol of passionate fans and school pride, but in an increasingly tense sports world, it also poses a threat to player safety. As Caitlyn Clark discovered last month against Ohio State, the danger of being on the wrong side of a court storm is even greater for top-10 teams and star players.

On Saturday, enthusiastic fans stormed the court after Wake Forest defeated Duke. The sight of hundreds of irrational, adrenaline-fueled fans and the urge to sprint onto their home court is a common occurrence nowadays. However, students storming the court against the two-meter-tall Duke player Kyle Filipowski is what unfairly puts Wake Forest in the headlines for all the wrong reasons.

The number of court stormings seems to have increased in recent years as the bar for what constitutes storming behavior has lowered and unrest of all kinds has become more common in the one-and-done era. Yet, on Saturday, brainless Wake fools who ran into Filipowski potentially causing harm may have been the final straw in the court-storming epidemic.

After Filipowski was helped off the court due to a knee or ankle injury, Duke head coach Jon Scheyer questioned when court storming would be banned and lamented that court storming has become more dangerous than during his time as an active player in 2010. Scheyer expressed concern for the well-being of his players in the face of reckless behavior by fans.

It’s been 10 years since the SEC „banned“ court stormings. Earlier this week, LSU was fined $100,000 after fans, including Angel Reese, stormed the court when they defeated No. 17 Kentucky. For the next violation, the fine increases to $250,000 and for the third violation, $500,000. However, students who owe tens of thousands in tuition fees couldn’t care less about the financial penalties their university may face.

Perhaps it’s time for a collaborative effort and a middle ground in the form of college basketball introducing its own shot clock for fans when it comes to court storming. If the core of the problem is to remove players from the field, consider implementing a 24-second countdown for rushing the field, similar to Scheyer’s suggestion. At least have a protocol in place if fans storm the court. It’s better than what the sport currently offers.

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