Home Medizin Ein innovatives fahrzeuginternes Sensorsystem hilft bei der Erkennung kognitiver Beeinträchtigungen bei älteren Fahrern

Ein innovatives fahrzeuginternes Sensorsystem hilft bei der Erkennung kognitiver Beeinträchtigungen bei älteren Fahrern

von NFI Redaktion

Approximately 4 to 8 million older adults with mild cognitive impairment are currently driving in the United States, and one-third of them will develop dementia within five years. People with advancing dementia eventually become unable to drive safely, yet many are unaware of their cognitive decline.

Currently, screening and assessment services for driving can only test a small number of individuals with cognitive issues, leaving many who need to know if they require treatment in the dark.

Researchers from nursing, engineering, and neuropsychology at Florida Atlantic University are testing and evaluating an inconspicuous sensor system developed by them, which is light and easily available in vehicles. This technology could represent the first step towards future widespread, cost-effective early warnings of cognitive changes for this large number of older drivers in the US and elsewhere.

In their study published in the journal BMC Geriatrics, they systematically investigate how this system could detect abnormal driving behavior indicative of cognitive impairment. Few studies have reported on the use of continuous, inconspicuous sensors and associated monitoring devices to detect subtle fluctuations in the performance of highly complex everyday activities over time. This significant portion of older drivers represents an untapped opportunity to detect cognitive decline.

Neuropathologies of Alzheimer’s disease have been found in the brains of older drivers who died in car accidents, and who were unaware they were suffering from the disease and showed no obvious signs of it. The purpose of our study arose from the importance of detecting cognitive dysfunctions as early and efficiently as possible. Sensor systems embedded in older drivers‘ vehicles could detect these changes and generate early warnings of possible changes in cognition.“

Ruth Tappen, Ed.D., lead researcher, principal author, and Christine E. Lynn Eminent Scholar and Professor, FAU Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing

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